Spring 2015| Posse National Newsletter

  

Berkeley Scholar Uses Computer Science for Social Justice

University of California, Berkeley, Scholar Jackie Garcia.

Hired as a research apprentice at the University of California, Berkeley, Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS), Posse Scholar Jacqueline “Jackie” Garcia is exploring the connections between her two passions: computer science and social justice.

A sophomore, Jackie is part of a team at CITRIS developing a software platform called AppCivisit that will help activists collaborate to report issues, propose solutions, and evaluate proposals for collective action.

“Being a research apprentice on this project was a great opportunity for me to understand how technology connects with my passion for social justice,” says Jackie.

Growing up in Compton, a city of south Los Angeles, Jackie was determined to make her parents proud and to be a role model for her younger siblings. She became very involved with academics, summer internships and sports to strengthen her college application.

“As an undocumented student I didn’t feel at first that I could go to college,” says Jackie. “The dropout rate of my high school is huge. I pushed myself to apply for Posse and in every interview I felt like I accomplished something for myself.”

Selected as a student fellow for Berkeley’s UndocuAlly program, Jackie is active on campus to raise awareness about the issues facing undocumented students.

“I’m looking forward to working with people who are interested in having some sort of social impact,” says Jackie. “I want to combine technology and education, especially to provide more access to underrepresented students. I’m hoping to bring more Latinos into computer science.”

View other stories in the Posse National Quarterly